a Christian response to climate change — 2.0

I’m aware that my previous post (about providence and climate change) was a bit of a tangled mess. Let me try to tease it apart a little and lay out the direction in which I’d love to see the conversation move.

What I’m proposing to do is:

  • Take another look at the question of how Christians should respond to climate change. In particular, I’d like to focus on some of the urgent, practical questions — about how to balance competing priorities, etc — that I never really got around to dealing with in my earlier reflections (such as THISTHIS or THIS).
  • Yet in turning to application I don’t want to turn my back on theology. I’ll continue to try to gather my thoughts around the topics of God’s providence — his gracious, sovereign and purposeful interaction with the world he has made — and human stewardship, taking Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness as a touchstone.

Here (in a little more detail) is how I’m proposing to tackle it:

  1. ‘If you are the Son of God…’ — God’s provision and human stewardship
  2. ‘Not by bread alone’ — the heart of human stewardship
  3. ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test’ — the shape of human stewardship
  4. ‘Serve him only’ — the goal of human stewardship
  5. ‘They will bear you up’ — the un-looked-for satisfaction of stewardship

I expect to add further sub-points as I elaborate on each of these ‘theme-statements’, fleshing out what they might mean for our responsibility to care for God’s good creation (although, of course, they have wider application — and indeed, the fact that creation care isn’t the only game in town is something with which we’ll no doubt wrestle as we move forward).

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2 comments

  1. Brother,

    Sorry I haven’t been reading much of this in the past few weeks. However, I’ll be interested to see how you plan on using Christ’s temptation (and particularly Luke’s account?) as a touchstone for this…

    dmic

    1. No need to apologise, Dan!

      I’ll probably be basing it on Matthew’s account for the most part.

      I’m planning to offer some justification (and explanation) as I launch into it. Basically, I’m more and more convinced that this encounter takes us into the heart of the cluster of themes around the doctrine of providence — God’s sovereignty and goodness as well as human trust and responsibility. And while I don’t want to treat Jesus merely as an example for us to imitate, I do want to take seriously his presentation as the true Israel (in Matthew) and true human being (in Luke).

      Looking forward to hearing what you think!

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